Custom Built

August 16th, 2007 § 6 Comments

Here is a picture of a sink base my client and I created to solve the corner sink problem of too much wasted space.

The typical corner sink base the client had before was angled in such a way that it pushed the sink base farther into the room wasting a lot of space in front of and behind the sink.


The redesign I worked on with the homeowner, allowed for a 46″ base cabinet, two sets of bifold doors allowing for the sink to be set back further into the corner than before. Hoping for the largest sink possible, we used a fairly large Blancowave 37″ stainless Steel Sink.

One glitch was minor; the doors arrived with piano hinges.


We replaced them with concealed hinges. The outcome was successful and the customer is enjoying her corner sink now more thank before.

We also got rid of the 15″ trash compactor and replaced it with 18″ double trash cans to the left of the sink, thus making more usable counter space between the cook top and the sink.

Can you guess? The 18″ three drawer base is disguising the 18″ trash base. The top drawer is operable. The two drawers false panels hiding the pull out trash cans. That was a clever trick we used to give the appearance of drawers to match the drawers to the left of the cook top. The client is big on symmetry.

This project is an example of how ideas evolve as we work our way through the design. When the client first came to see me, the idea was to remove huge wasted space of the corner sink. Too much unusable space behind the sink and too much space projecting into the room. The client was so tired of this space that they were willing to place half of the sink into an L shape corner in order to reclaim the inches for usable counter and base cabinet use. The problem I saw in their initial concept is that we are replacing one awkward configuration for another. Another aspect of the design; originally the idea was to keep the 20 year old Thermador oven that still worked great! The problem: it was in a spot in the kitchen that would not work well with the new peninsula we wanted to add for more counter space. Leaving the oven in the original location would create a barrier or “walk a around” from the dining room. Not a good idea. We placed a movable cart in front of the pantry to show a possible location of the peninsula. We rejected this and placed the peninsula off the opposite wall.

We decided to move the oven to the opposite wall of the cook top, but because the oven was vented, Mrs. R. finally warmed up to the idea of a new Thermador when we found out moving the old Thermador meant additional costs with a new roof jack to vent the old oven. The second concept we decided to nix, was the placement of the refrigerator in the corner. As with the old corner sink, the refrigerator was decidedly too big to be placed on an angle. Instead we jettisoned the pantry to the old desk area in the kitchen, which was not used as a desk at all by the client. We found the depth of the desk area worked well so that we could place a pantry on one side and a glass fronted curio cabinet accessible from the hallway. Voila! A space that gave us a bonus storage.

In the redesigned space: oven and pantry moved, refrigerator inched over; the sink stayed in the corner with a more tailored fit with a custom cabinet. We also custom built the space to house the GE Profile Refrigerator.

It was important we put back simple key features inside the cabinets. Tray dividers are essential.

The “Tray Stay” is a Omega National Product, made in maple veneer. Installed in u channel brackets with screws. Fastened into multiple locations. Great feature. You decide what span you need between the dividers.


Notice in the “after photo” the bump out in the side panels and cabinet above the refer. to allow for a 28″ case depth refrigerator. The before shot shows the massiveness of the old refrigerator. The new refrigerator is still 25.5 cu. ft.

Before: After:

We also liked the idea of “side lights” on the glass door cabinet.


Custom Built

August 16th, 2007 § 6 Comments

Here is a picture of a sink base my client and I created to solve the corner sink problem of too much wasted space.

The typical corner sink base the client had before was angled in such a way that it pushed the sink base farther into the room wasting a lot of space in front of and behind the sink.


The redesign I worked on with the homeowner, allowed for a 46″ base cabinet, two sets of bifold doors allowing for the sink to be set back further into the corner than before. Hoping for the largest sink possible, we used a fairly large Blancowave 37″ stainless Steel Sink.

One glitch was minor; the doors arrived with piano hinges.


We replaced them with concealed hinges. The outcome was successful and the customer is enjoying her corner sink now more thank before.

We also got rid of the 15″ trash compactor and replaced it with 18″ double trash cans to the left of the sink, thus making more usable counter space between the cook top and the sink.

Can you guess? The 18″ three drawer base is disguising the 18″ trash base. The top drawer is operable. The two drawers false panels hiding the pull out trash cans. That was a clever trick we used to give the appearance of drawers to match the drawers to the left of the cook top. The client is big on symmetry.

This project is an example of how ideas evolve as we work our way through the design. When the client first came to see me, the idea was to remove huge wasted space of the corner sink. Too much unusable space behind the sink and too much space projecting into the room. The client was so tired of this space that they were willing to place half of the sink into an L shape corner in order to reclaim the inches for usable counter and base cabinet use. The problem I saw in their initial concept is that we are replacing one awkward configuration for another. Another aspect of the design; originally the idea was to keep the 20 year old Thermador oven that still worked great! The problem: it was in a spot in the kitchen that would not work well with the new peninsula we wanted to add for more counter space. Leaving the oven in the original location would create a barrier or “walk a around” from the dining room. Not a good idea. We placed a movable cart in front of the pantry to show a possible location of the peninsula. We rejected this and placed the peninsula off the opposite wall.

We decided to move the oven to the opposite wall of the cook top, but because the oven was vented, Mrs. R. finally warmed up to the idea of a new Thermador when we found out moving the old Thermador meant additional costs with a new roof jack to vent the old oven. The second concept we decided to nix, was the placement of the refrigerator in the corner. As with the old corner sink, the refrigerator was decidedly too big to be placed on an angle. Instead we jettisoned the pantry to the old desk area in the kitchen, which was not used as a desk at all by the client. We found the depth of the desk area worked well so that we could place a pantry on one side and a glass fronted curio cabinet accessible from the hallway. Voila! A space that gave us a bonus storage.

In the redesigned space: oven and pantry moved, refrigerator inched over; the sink stayed in the corner with a more tailored fit with a custom cabinet. We also custom built the space to house the GE Profile Refrigerator.

It was important we put back simple key features inside the cabinets. Tray dividers are essential.

The “Tray Stay” is a Omega National Product, made in maple veneer. Installed in u channel brackets with screws. Fastened into multiple locations. Great feature. You decide what span you need between the dividers.


Notice in the “after photo” the bump out in the side panels and cabinet above the refer. to allow for a 28″ case depth refrigerator. The before shot shows the massiveness of the old refrigerator. The new refrigerator is still 25.5 cu. ft.

Before: After:

We also liked the idea of “side lights” on the glass door cabinet.


Keep your Bathroom Mold Free

August 15th, 2007 § Leave a Comment


What is a bathroom topic doing in a Kitchen Blog you may be asking yourself. Occasionally, I venture into designing bathrooms for clients. One client asked me lately about controlling mold growth. Here is a link to an article I found, “Keep Your Bathroom Mold Free”, that offers simple tips anyone can follow. These are simple and sound tips I find myself sharing with clients all the time. I find it interesting that most people don’t run the vent fan in the bathroom at all, a very useful piece of equipment to evacuate steam and moisture from a bathroom. Check out the the link is to The Daily Tubber, a fun and useful website on claw foot tubs and other interesting bathroom facts.

Keep in mind, nothing can be 100% bullet proof, mold needs food and water to grow. Any wet environment can become a breeding ground if left untreated and neglected from day to day maintenance.

You can specify materials that will act as preventive measures in building your project but don’t forget to keep up the maintenance once the contractors are gone. For instance, epoxy grouts are gaining popularity in residential applications. Custom Building Products has a product called 100% Epoxy. It contains a product called MoldGard® Technology — Custom Building Products’ effective and environmentally sound approach designed to inhibit moisture intrusion and neutralize the food source that mold and mildew thrive on. It Combines with any Polyblend® Sanded Tile Grout to produce a highly stain-resistant and chemical-resistant epoxy grout. Laticrete has a product called SpectraLOCK, an epoxy based grout that utilizes a revolutionary breakthrough in technology. Its unique cross-linking system performs like an epoxy with respect to color uniformity, durability, and stain resistance and it is easy to use like a Portland cement base grout.

There are disclaimers with these products you should be aware of:
1. Some soft polished marble or delicate glazed or glass tile might be scratched. Laticrete recommends applying a small test area to determine results before grouting entire installation.
2. Epoxy resins may affect the color of porous stone. Verify results with a test area.
3. LATICRETE SpectraLOCK Grout is resistant to staining when exposed to most household products and cleaners (e.g. ketchup). However, long term exposure to any material without
proper cleaning and maintenance will increase the probability of staining.
4. Custom Building products cautions when used on exterior installations, color variations may occur over time, especially with lighter shades. May stain light colored marble or stone. Test a small area and check for staining prior to grouting the entire installation.

Another day: I’ll come back to talk about paperless drywall.

Keep your Bathroom Mold Free

August 15th, 2007 § Leave a Comment


What is a bathroom topic doing in a Kitchen Blog you may be asking yourself. Occasionally, I venture into designing bathrooms for clients. One client asked me lately about controlling mold growth. Here is a link to an article I found, “Keep Your Bathroom Mold Free”, that offers simple tips anyone can follow. These are simple and sound tips I find myself sharing with clients all the time. I find it interesting that most people don’t run the vent fan in the bathroom at all, a very useful piece of equipment to evacuate steam and moisture from a bathroom. Check out the the link is to The Daily Tubber, a fun and useful website on claw foot tubs and other interesting bathroom facts.

Keep in mind, nothing can be 100% bullet proof, mold needs food and water to grow. Any wet environment can become a breeding ground if left untreated and neglected from day to day maintenance.

You can specify materials that will act as preventive measures in building your project but don’t forget to keep up the maintenance once the contractors are gone. For instance, epoxy grouts are gaining popularity in residential applications. Custom Building Products has a product called 100% Epoxy. It contains a product called MoldGard® Technology — Custom Building Products’ effective and environmentally sound approach designed to inhibit moisture intrusion and neutralize the food source that mold and mildew thrive on. It Combines with any Polyblend® Sanded Tile Grout to produce a highly stain-resistant and chemical-resistant epoxy grout. Laticrete has a product called SpectraLOCK, an epoxy based grout that utilizes a revolutionary breakthrough in technology. Its unique cross-linking system performs like an epoxy with respect to color uniformity, durability, and stain resistance and it is easy to use like a Portland cement base grout.

There are disclaimers with these products you should be aware of:
1. Some soft polished marble or delicate glazed or glass tile might be scratched. Laticrete recommends applying a small test area to determine results before grouting entire installation.
2. Epoxy resins may affect the color of porous stone. Verify results with a test area.
3. LATICRETE SpectraLOCK Grout is resistant to staining when exposed to most household products and cleaners (e.g. ketchup). However, long term exposure to any material without
proper cleaning and maintenance will increase the probability of staining.
4. Custom Building products cautions when used on exterior installations, color variations may occur over time, especially with lighter shades. May stain light colored marble or stone. Test a small area and check for staining prior to grouting the entire installation.

Another day: I’ll come back to talk about paperless drywall.

Don’t buy the hype on new appliances

August 15th, 2007 § Leave a Comment

Highly hyped kitchen products often disappoint. That’s the message in Consumer Reports’ 2007 August issue, in its annual kitchen package. The magazine’s tests found shortcomings in many highly promoted, costly items. Often, an old standard proved the better choice.

What have you purchased and were disappointed in the performance of the product?

New and Improved Low VOC Paints

August 12th, 2007 § 1 Comment


It’s been a while since I posted. Summer time is my busiest season.
Since my customers are asking, I have the latest info on what’s new in Eco-Friendly Paints.
Low VOC Paints gained a bad rap from painters when they were first developed. The biggest complaint was the quick drying time. However due to consumer demand, R & D depts. with many paint manufacturers have been improving the performance of Low VOC Paints.

Green reading: reference the August 10, 2007, New and Improved Low-VOC Paints article in Kitchen and Bath Business for the full story and additional links.

New and Improved Low VOC Paints

August 12th, 2007 § 1 Comment


It’s been a while since I posted. Summer time is my busiest season.
Since my customers are asking, I have the latest info on what’s new in Eco-Friendly Paints.
Low VOC Paints gained a bad rap from painters when they were first developed. The biggest complaint was the quick drying time. However due to consumer demand, R & D depts. with many paint manufacturers have been improving the performance of Low VOC Paints.

Green reading: reference the August 10, 2007, New and Improved Low-VOC Paints article in Kitchen and Bath Business for the full story and additional links.

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