New Product Watch: Grab Bars in Plain Sight:

December 24th, 2009 § 5 Comments


Grab bars or Safety Bars, what ever you call them, when you think of grab bars, what comes to mind? Utilitarian? Ugly, even? Well the folks at Health Craft Products came out with a new line called the Invisia Collection.

The Invisia™ Collection is based on a simple concept; GRAB BARS SHOULD NOT LOOK LIKE GRAB BARS.

In keeping with this concept, Health Craft Products has designed a series of luxurious bathroom accessories that also happen to be grab bars hidden in plain sight. Great ideas for “Aging in Place” Design.



WTRH-CRP, Wall Toilet Roll Holder, Bright Polish Chrome Plate


Add a touch of elegance and just the right amount of support with the Accent Ring. Corian® shelves provide ample space for toilet roll storage or other items while the discrete hand rail offers trustworthy support.


 ACR-CRP, Accent Ring, Bright Polish Chrome Plate

 A unique and incredibly solid handrail designed to contour circular shower fixtures and provide support when accessing controls.

  CS-CRP, Corner Shelf, Bright Polish Chrome Plate


The Corian® shelf provides a generous surface that can be removed for easy cleaning. The reliable support rail is always within reach to offer a helping hand. 




TB-24-CRP, Towel Bar, 24″/61cm, Polish Chrome Plate

Add a simple yet elegant touch to any bathing area. The 16″ or 24″ towel bar provides ample space to display virtually any towel set while the graceful arc of the integrated support rail creates a functionally superb design element.


For more information visit, http://healthcraftproducts.com/invisiacollection.htm

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Oyster Tub By Salvinistile

September 19th, 2009 § 3 Comments


Specs.
Size: 70.85″ x 42.15″ x 26.60″
Material: Marble
Design By: Architect Carla Baratelli for Salvinistile
Country: Italy

This is more than just design in marble. As shown from their web site, click the photos to link back to more photos from House 8, this is European designed “concept living”. Shapes influenced by nature is a trend we are seeing more of in sinks and tubs.

Great design if you are Michael Phelps, limber enough to move in and out of water like a fish. For those of us who are aging less than gracefully, planning a design with safety factors in mind is critical.

The National Kitchen & Bath Association developed the Bathroom Planning Guidelines with Access Standards to provide designers with good planning practices that consider the needs of a range of users.

Grab Bars: Plan grab bars to facilitate access to and maneuvering within the tub and shower areas.

Tub and shower walls should be prepared (reinforced) at time of construction to allow for installation of grab bars to support a static load of 250 lbs.

Grab bars should be placed at least 33” – 36” above the floor.

Grab bars must be 11⁄4” to 2” in diameter and extend 11⁄2” from the wall.

Access Standard

Recommended: Walls throughout the bathroom should be prepared (reinforced) at time of construction to allow for installation of grab bars to support a minimum of 250 lbs. of pressure.

Grab bars should be placed according to the needs and height of the user, particularly near the tub/shower and the toilet.

Code Reference:

  • Grab bars should be installed at the tub, shower, and toilet according to the following:
  • Bathtubs with permanent seats: Two horizontal grab bars (a1) should be provided on the back wall, one between 33” and 36” above the floor and the other 9” above the rim of the bathtub (a2). Each grab bar should be no more than 15” from the head end wall or 12” from the foot end wall. A grab bar 24” long should be provided on the foot end wall at the front edge of the bathtub. (ANSI 607.4.1)
  • Bathtubs without permanent seats: Two horizontal grab bars should be provided on the back wall, one between 33” and 36” above the floor and the other 9” above the rim of the bathtub (a3). Each grab bar should be at least 24” long and no more than 24” from the head end wall or 12” from the foot end wall. A grab bar 24” long should be provided on the foot end wall at the front edge of the bathtub. A grab bar 12” long should be provided on the head end wall at the front edge of the bathtub (a4). (ANSI 607.4.2)

For More information:
Salvini Stile
NKBA.org
Michael Phelps Photo Credit Link

Firefighters ‘chagrined’ by station blaze

June 29th, 2009 § 2 Comments

Here is an interesting story. No one is immune from danger in the kitchen, not even firefighters. Fire fighters learn lesson of leaving food unattended on a hot stove.

See story from the Honolulu Advertiser. http://www.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/20090623/NEWS13/906230326/

Viking Range Corporation Recalls Built-In Refrigerators Due to Injury Hazard; Doors Can Detach

June 16th, 2009 § 1 Comment

This just in from the CPSC.

NEWS from CPSC

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

Office of Information and Public Affairs Washington, DC 20207


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 16, 2009
Release # 09-242
Firm’s Recall Hotline: (888) 345-2650
CPSC Recall Hotline: (800) 638-2772
CPSC Media Contact: (301) 504-7908


Viking Range Corporation Recalls Built-In Refrigerators Due to Injury Hazard; Doors Can Detach

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in cooperation with the firm named below, today announced a voluntary recall of the following consumer product. Consumers should stop using recalled products immediately unless otherwise instructed.

Name of Product: Viking Built-In Side-by-Side Refrigerator/Freezers and Refrigerators with Bottom Freezers

Units: About 45,000

Manufacturer: Viking Range Corporation, of Greenwood, Miss.

Hazard: The refrigerator’s doors can detach, posing an injury hazard to consumers.

Incidents/Injuries: Viking has received about 57 reports of doors detaching, including four reports of injuries involving bruises, broken toes/fingers, and strains. Also, several incidents of minor damage to floors and counters have been reported.

Description: This recall involves Viking built-in 48-inch wide side-by-side refrigerator/freezers and the built-in 36-inch wide refrigerators with bottom freezers with model and serial numbers with date codes listed below. The refrigerators come in stainless steel and various colors and wood finishes and are built into the kitchen cabinetry. “Viking” is written on the front of the refrigerator. The model and serial numbers are located either behind the produce drawer or on the ceiling of the interior of the refrigerators. The 42-inch wide or freestanding refrigerators are not included in this recall.

Model Numbers Starting With Date Codes
VCSB481, VCSB482, DDSB482, DFSB482
DTSB482, DDBB362, VCBB360, VCBB362
DFBB362, DTBB362, DTBB363
All units
VCSB483, DDSB483, DFSB483, DTSB483 Date codes before 030104
VCSB483D, DDSB483D, DFSB483D Date codes before 030105
VCBB363 Date codes before 102005
DDBB363 Date codes before 112305
DFBB363 Date codes before 041006

The first six numbers in the serial number are the manufacture date of the unit in [mm][dd][yy] format, e.g., serial number 051903G0000000375 was manufactured on May 19, 2003 and serial number F01250210170 was manufactured on January 25, 2002.

Sold by: Appliance and specialty retailers nationwide from July 1999 through April 2006 for between $4,725 and $6,400.

Manufactured in: United States

Remedy: Consumers with recalled refrigerators should contact Viking immediately to schedule a free in-home repair. Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled refrigerator if the door isn’t sealing properly, is sagging, or fails to open and close properly. If the door is functioning properly, consumers may continue to use the refrigerator until it has been repaired.

Consumer Contact: For more information, contact Viking toll-free at (888) 345-2650 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or visit Viking’s Web site at www.vikingrange.com


CPSC is still interested in receiving incident or injury reports that are either directly related to this product recall or involve a different hazard with the same product. Please tell us about it by visiting https://www.cpsc.gov/cgibin/incident.aspx

Send the link for this page to a friend! The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of serious injury or death from thousands of types of consumer products under the agency’s jurisdiction. The CPSC is committed to protecting consumers and families from products that pose a fire, electrical, chemical, or mechanical hazard. The CPSC’s work to ensure the safety of consumer products – such as toys, cribs, power tools, cigarette lighters, and household chemicals – contributed significantly to the decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 30 years.

To report a dangerous product or a product-related injury, call CPSC’s Hotline at (800) 638-2772 or CPSC’s teletypewriter at (800) 638-8270. To join a CPSC e-mail subscription list, please go to https://www.cpsc.gov/cpsclist.aspx. Consumers can obtain recall and general safety information by logging on to CPSC’s Web site at www.cpsc.gov.

#1 Cause of Fire in the Home

June 14th, 2009 § 5 Comments

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