Kichler’s Pro LED

January 26th, 2009 § Leave a Comment

Pro LED under cabinet lighting features an ultra-thin, half-inch profile


A new product on the market.


For use inside a curio, below a cabinet or in a variety of other areas, these energy-efficient fixtures use 75 percent less electricity than typical incandescent lighting. Plus, they’re so thin they’re nearly invisible — just 3/8” thick. In addition, the Design Pro LED discs offer a warm white color rendering and a lifespan of 20 years. A variety of finishes are available to blend into any surrounding.

For more information: go to Kichler Lighting

The News on Lighting

February 13th, 2008 § Leave a Comment

A new LED recessed can light made by LLF is finally here. Last week I was treated to a show of new lighting products available for kitchen and bath remodels and I am very happy to report I am very impressed at the capability of the LLF product. Peggy Deras, at Kitchen Exchange, has written a very informative article on the new LLF LED can light and I would encourage my readers to follow the link to the article. LED Recessed Lights are Here- REALLY HERE!!!

The News on Lighting

February 13th, 2008 § 2 Comments

A new LED recessed can light made by LLF is finally here. Last week I was treated to a show of new lighting products available for kitchen and bath remodels and I am very happy to report I am very impressed at the capability of the LLF product. Peggy Deras, at Kitchen Exchange, has written a very informative article on the new LLF LED can light and I would encourage my readers to follow the link to the article. LED Recessed Lights are Here- REALLY HERE!!!

Make the most of small space

February 9th, 2008 § Leave a Comment

A view out the back from the kitchen.
(Michael Robinson Chavez, Los Angeles Times)
I love sharing clever ideas. This small L shape kitchen benefits with a flood of light on the counter tops without losing wall cabinet storage.
Well done!

Make the most of small space

February 9th, 2008 § Leave a Comment

A view out the back from the kitchen.
(Michael Robinson Chavez, Los Angeles Times)
I love sharing clever ideas. This small L shape kitchen benefits with a flood of light on the counter tops without losing wall cabinet storage.
Well done!

ALUMINUM FRAME LED PANELS

December 2nd, 2007 § Leave a Comment


I saw these illuminated glass shelves at the Kitchen and Bath Show this past year and loved the idea of each shelf having it’s own source of light. No more shadows from the top. On their own, the severity of the linear pattern of the glass may appear very techno but when paired with resin inserts on framed doors, the look can be anything you want.

°eluma is an innovative LED panel that was created in conjunction with Tresco International,
one of the nation’s leading lighting distributors. °eluma can be used as illuminated shelving
in kitchen and bathroom cabinets, decorative panels, doors, etc. The patented technology
enables the glass shelves to be fully adjustable in cabinet applications with the incorporation
of a power bar into the cabinet and plug and play panel connectors. Hard wiring is not
required and therefore the end user can install the product without a professional
electrician. Previous lighting methods used in cabinet applications have not had the
adjustability nor the ease of installation that °eluma features.

In addition, °eluma utilizes Tresco International’s environmentally friendly, 12 VDC, low energy
LEDs as the light source. The LED panels emit minimal heat thus making the product
extremely safe. The high quality LEDs have a lifespan of 50,000 hours (11.4 years at 12 hours
per day) and are maintenance free.

For more information, visit: http://www.element-designs.com/eluma.html

ALUMINUM FRAME LED PANELS

December 2nd, 2007 § 2 Comments


I saw these illuminated glass shelves at the Kitchen and Bath Show this past year and loved the idea of each shelf having it’s own source of light. No more shadows from the top. On their own, the severity of the linear pattern of the glass may appear very techno but when paired with resin inserts on framed doors, the look can be anything you want.

°eluma is an innovative LED panel that was created in conjunction with Tresco International,
one of the nation’s leading lighting distributors. °eluma can be used as illuminated shelving
in kitchen and bathroom cabinets, decorative panels, doors, etc. The patented technology
enables the glass shelves to be fully adjustable in cabinet applications with the incorporation
of a power bar into the cabinet and plug and play panel connectors. Hard wiring is not
required and therefore the end user can install the product without a professional
electrician. Previous lighting methods used in cabinet applications have not had the
adjustability nor the ease of installation that °eluma features.

In addition, °eluma utilizes Tresco International’s environmentally friendly, 12 VDC, low energy
LEDs as the light source. The LED panels emit minimal heat thus making the product
extremely safe. The high quality LEDs have a lifespan of 50,000 hours (11.4 years at 12 hours
per day) and are maintenance free.

For more information, visit: http://www.element-designs.com/eluma.html

Is the ceiling fan the light fixture of choice for the male race?

December 1st, 2007 § Leave a Comment

Maybe it is the fact that ceiling fan’s have cool remote controls.
In any event, give a little will ya’!

CFL Sizes and Shapes : ENERGY STAR

September 8th, 2007 § 2 Comments


For clients who are planning to purchase new lighting the task can be daunting. What type of bulb? Is it energy efficient? Recently a client showed me the fixtures she hopes to purchase.

“I saw a light fixture I want in the Pottery Barn catalog. Can I use a CFL in place of the Type G-10 bulb, What about a Type A?”

Can’t figure out the differences between light bulbs types? Type G, Type A, Par 38. It’s enough to make your head spin. What do they all mean? Are we talking about a high strung guy on the golf course or lighting for God’s sake? Don’t fret, you can impress at your next cocktail party if you know the difference between bulbs. Even a seasoned designer will defer to a lighting consultant for advise. So here is a cheat sheet to get you started in identifying the differences between bulbs courtesy of Energy Star.
CFL Sizes and Shapes : ENERGY STAR

Where to Use CFLs Around Your Home

Now that you know CFLs are available in a variety of shapes and sizes, where should you use them?

The following chart provides guidance on how to choose the best CFL for a specific fixture. You can either look for the fixture you want to use a CFL in, or pick your favorite CFL and see where the best fixtures to use it in. In many cases, a certain CFL type can be used in multiple fixtures. For example, today’s bare spiral CFL is small enough to use in table lamps, wall sconces, ceiling-mounted fixtures, ceiling fans, etc.

Now that you have got your bulbs identified, don’t forget…

Color Temperature — Specify the light color you want

Different light bulbs emit different colors of light. Lighting color ranges from cool to warm tones, and is known as color temperature. The color temperature of a light source indicates the color of the light emitted measured in degrees Kelvin. Color Temperature is not an indicator of lamp heat. Refer to the chart from Energy Star for help getting the color right. The chart shows a range of color temperatures, from warm to cool.

Below is a handy chart explaining color temperature from Light Bulbs Direct, a retail web source for purchasing bulbs on line.

By convention, yellow-red colors (like the flames of a fire) are considered warm, and blue-green colors (like light from an overcast sky) are considered cool. Confusingly, higher Kelvin temperatures (3600–5500 K) are what we consider cool and lower color temperatures (2700–3000 K) are considered warm. Cool light is preferred for visual tasks because it produces higher contrast than warm light. Warm light is preferred for living spaces because it is more flattering to skin tones and clothing. A color temperature of 2700–3600 K is generally recommended for most indoor general and task lighting applications. Color Temperature is not an indicator of lamp heat.

CFL Sizes and Shapes : ENERGY STAR

September 8th, 2007 § 2 Comments


For clients who are planning to purchase new lighting the task can be daunting. What type of bulb? Is it energy efficient? Recently a client showed me the fixtures she hopes to purchase.

“I saw a light fixture I want in the Pottery Barn catalog. Can I use a CFL in place of the Type G-10 bulb, What about a Type A?”

Can’t figure out the differences between light bulbs types? Type G, Type A, Par 38. It’s enough to make your head spin. What do they all mean? Are we talking about a high strung guy on the golf course or lighting for God’s sake? Don’t fret, you can impress at your next cocktail party if you know the difference between bulbs. Even a seasoned designer will defer to a lighting consultant for advise. So here is a cheat sheet to get you started in identifying the differences between bulbs courtesy of Energy Star.
CFL Sizes and Shapes : ENERGY STAR

Where to Use CFLs Around Your Home

Now that you know CFLs are available in a variety of shapes and sizes, where should you use them?

The following chart provides guidance on how to choose the best CFL for a specific fixture. You can either look for the fixture you want to use a CFL in, or pick your favorite CFL and see where the best fixtures to use it in. In many cases, a certain CFL type can be used in multiple fixtures. For example, today’s bare spiral CFL is small enough to use in table lamps, wall sconces, ceiling-mounted fixtures, ceiling fans, etc.

Now that you have got your bulbs identified, don’t forget…

Color Temperature — Specify the light color you want

Different light bulbs emit different colors of light. Lighting color ranges from cool to warm tones, and is known as color temperature. The color temperature of a light source indicates the color of the light emitted measured in degrees Kelvin. Color Temperature is not an indicator of lamp heat. Refer to the chart from Energy Star for help getting the color right. The chart shows a range of color temperatures, from warm to cool.

Below is a handy chart explaining color temperature from Light Bulbs Direct, a retail web source for purchasing bulbs on line.

By convention, yellow-red colors (like the flames of a fire) are considered warm, and blue-green colors (like light from an overcast sky) are considered cool. Confusingly, higher Kelvin temperatures (3600–5500 K) are what we consider cool and lower color temperatures (2700–3000 K) are considered warm. Cool light is preferred for visual tasks because it produces higher contrast than warm light. Warm light is preferred for living spaces because it is more flattering to skin tones and clothing. A color temperature of 2700–3600 K is generally recommended for most indoor general and task lighting applications. Color Temperature is not an indicator of lamp heat.

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